Reflection: 3 Key Elements in the Growth Process

Change is an inevitable force and reoccurring element. Strong leaders and organizations know how to navigate the various stages of change in a way that creates new growth and opportunities. They do this through continuous reflection about themselves and their organization as a whole. Below are three key elements essential to this reflection and growth process:

1. Individual Reflection:

We use the model below to illustrate the stages many find themselves in as they experience change in their lives and careers. The four phases of individual change are:Phases of Skill and Change

  1. Unconsciously unskilled
  2. Consciously unskilled
  3. Consciously skilled
  4. Unconsciously skilled

When a change is introduced, through reflection, we find ourselves somewhere on this continuum. The mere act of reflecting can help us move in an instant! In fact, in order to move to a different stage, we need to reflect and situate ourselves on this learning curve. 

2. Group Reflection:

The same is true for group and organizational reflection. When groups reflect on both individual and organizational performance, they find out what is working well and where gaps may exist. Once these elements are identified, the organization has the chance to move forward in a positive direction.

3. Call to Action:

Once we have reflected, both individually and as a group, we can begin to make adjustments, take actions, and set goals. Here, we are taking the pieces learned from reflection and incorporating them into our system. We are carrying out the necessary steps and striving to meet our goals.

reflection practiceReflect:

As leaders of reflective practice, it’s our job to structure these three key elements for the most powerful opportunity to improve. Individual reflection, plus group discussion, plus a call to action–these make reflective practice powerful.

We encourage you to reflect on your current stage. What steps can you and your team take in the quieter months of the year to move through the continuum and further achieve your organization’s goals?


Asti Kelley, Studer Education℠

Source: Studer Education℠ Coaches’ Chats | Feature image: The HR World | Phases of Change Continuum: Abraham Maslow; 1940; “Four Stages for Learning Any New Skill”; Gordon Training International by Noel Burch; 1970

 

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