Continuous change is a way of life for people in organizations.

Organizations are facing more pressure than ever to transform their practices in order to improve their outcomes. Competition is fierce. The speed of information and higher demands from consumers forces leaders to shift the way change is approached. Commonly, there is much anxiety attached to change, people like to do things, “the way they’ve always done it,” but that’s not the attitude that will achieve success in today OR tomorrow’s world. Individuals, leaders, and organizations need to view change as a positive opportunity to take their mission to a higher level. Focus on the goal, not the barrier.

This episode addresses questions, such as:

  • What does change look and feel like?
  • How do we shift the way we think about change?
  • Why must organizations adapt to continuous change rather than episodic change?
  • What are the 3 most common barriers to organizational change?

Related Resources

Anticipating Change

Most of us recognize the difference between leading and managing change. While both are necessary to successfully operate in or implement change, leading change involves an element of anticipation. Anticipating change means leaders have enough foresight and information to know what is likely to happen, strategize, and guide the larger team to success, in preparation for the pending shifts.

Building the Case for Change

We are living in a time when a major, multi-national industry can be disrupted by three guys in a garage. We are learning new ways of working and the future of the workplace is being redefined as we speak. On top of disruption, customers and their expectations have evolved dramatically as well.

How Do We Get Better at Change?

As founder of the change agency NOBL, Bud Caddell has seen this first-hand. With Fortune 500 clients he's witnessed countless new ideas die in committee because of dysfunction, fear, and toxic short-term incentives. And in high-growth startups he's watched exponential growth divide cultures, corrupt values, and destroy profitability.

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